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Friday, July 24, 2020 | History

7 edition of Functional electrical rehabilitation found in the catalog.

Functional electrical rehabilitation

technological restoration after spinal cord injury

by Chandler A. Phillips

  • 170 Want to read
  • 17 Currently reading

Published by Springer-Verlag in New York .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Spinal cord -- Wounds and injuries -- Patients -- Rehabilitation,
  • Exercise therapy,
  • Electric stimulation,
  • Electric Stimulation Therapy,
  • Spinal Cord Injuries -- rehabilitation

  • Edition Notes

    Includes bibliographical references and index.

    StatementChandler Allen Phillips.
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsRD594.3 .P47 1991
    The Physical Object
    Paginationxiii, 209 p. :
    Number of Pages209
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL1858140M
    ISBN 100387974598, 3540974598
    LC Control Number90010416

    Novel functional electrical stimulation for neurorehabilitation Article Literature Review (PDF Available) in Brain and nerve = Shinkei kenkyū no shinpo 62(2) February with 7, Functional Electrical Stimulation (FES) weightlifting involved electrical stimulation of the paralyzed muscles in the body. Electrodes were applied above the muscle, and transcutaneous electrical stimulation was used to excite the motor nerves to elicit a muscle contraction.

    Living with Paralysis. You have questions. We have answers. Whether you are newly paralyzed or a caregiver looking to help a loved one, we're here to provide the information you need. This section contains resources on health, costs and insurance, rehabilitation and more. BIONESS L Plus. The L Plus System adds a wireless easy to use thigh cuff, with low-level electrical stimulation, providing better support to weaker muscles in your thigh which in turn aids in control over bending and and straightening your knee to help you walk more naturally.

    Functional electrical therapy: Retraining grasping in spinal cord injury Popovic M.R., Thrasher T.A., Adams M.E., Takes V. Zivanovic V. and Tonack M.I. 3 1 ABSTRACT 2 3 Objective: To determine the clinical efficacy of functional electrical 4 therapy in the rehabilitation of . Cambridge Core - Neurology and Clinical Neuroscience - Textbook of Neural Repair and Rehabilitation - edited by Michael Selzer This book has been cited by the following publications. This chapter examines both the therapeutic aspects of functional electrical stimulation (FES) as well as the direct functional applications as it is.


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Functional electrical rehabilitation by Chandler A. Phillips Download PDF EPUB FB2

Functional Electrical Rehabilitation: Technological Restoration After Spinal Cord Injury Softcover reprint of the original 1st ed.

Edition by Chandler Allen Phillips (Author)Format: Paperback. Functional Electrical Rehabilitation: Technological Restoration After Spinal Cord Injury 1st Edition, Kindle EditionCited by: Functional Electrical Rehabilitation Technological Restoration After Spinal Cord Injury.

Authors: Phillips, Chandler A. Free PreviewBrand: Springer-Verlag New York. The system is reviewed in Chapter 8 of this book. As these Functional electrical rehabilitation book persons walked erect and upright among their wheel­ chair bound colleagues and took long, confident strides past exhibits extol­ ling the latest technological virtues of yet another "new" wheelchair (Fig.

1), I reflected on the paradox of it all. Functional electrical stimulation improves motor recovery of the lower extremity and walking ability of subjects with first acute stroke: a randomized placebo-controlled trial. Stroke ; 80 – by: 4. Electromyography-Based Functional Electrical Stimulation (FES) in Rehabilitation: /ch Loss or impairment in the ability of muscle movement or sensation is called Functional electrical rehabilitation book which is caused by disruption of communication of nerve impulses alongAuthor: Poulami Ghosh, Ankita Mazumder, Anwesha Banerjee, D.N.

Tibarewala. Get this from a library. Functional Electrical Rehabilitation: Technological Restoration After Spinal Cord Injury. [Chandler Allen Phillips] -- The tremendous development over the past decade of functional electrical rehabilitation, a treatment modality that greatly differs from conventional rehabilitation therapy, is presented in this.

T.A. Thrasher, V. Zivanovic, W. McIlroy, M.R. Popovic: Rehabilitation of reaching and grasping function in severe hemiplegic patients using functional electrical stimulation therapy, Neurorehabil. Neural Rep – () CrossRef Google ScholarCited by: 8.

Functional electrical stimulation (FES) devices can improve the way your child walks. The devices deliver small energy impulses to the muscles to improve movement. Functional electrical stimulation may help to improve: Range of motion; Muscle strength; Use of the hands, arms and legs; Ability to perform daily functional activities.

Citation: Hara Y () Rehabilitation with Functional Electrical Stimulation in Stroke Patients. Int J Phys Med Rehabil 1: doi: / Functional electrical stimulation (FES) has been studied and clinically applied to restoring or assisting motor functions lost due to spinal cord injury or cerebrovascular disease.

Electrical stimulation without control of functional movements is also used for therapy or in rehabilitation : Takashi Watanabe, Naoto Miura. Outcome of Functional Electrical Stimulation in the Rehabilitation of a Child with C-5 Tetraplegia.

The Journal of Spinal Cord Medicine: Vol. 22, No. 2, pp. Functional electrical stimulation. FES is an approach to rehabilitation that applies low-level electrical current to stimulate functional movements in muscles affected by nerve damage. It focuses on the restoration of useful movements, like standing, stepping, pedaling for exercise, reaching, or grasping.

About the book. Description. From a hospital admittance to discharge to outpatient rehabilitation, Spinal Cord Injuries addresses the wide spectrum of rehabilitation interventions and administrative and clinical issues specific to patients with spinal cord injuries.

COVID Resources. Reliable information about the coronavirus (COVID) is available from the World Health Organization (current situation, international travel).Numerous and frequently-updated resource results are available from this ’s WebJunction has pulled together information and resources to assist library staff as they consider how to handle coronavirus.

Functional Electrical Stimulation in Neurorehabilitation Jill Seale, PT, PhD, NCS TNSeminars Febru Objectives •Define functional electrical stimulation (FES) •Identify the possible mechanisms for therapeutic benefit from FES •Identify the common uses and methods for delivery of FES in neurological rehabilitation based on current.

This paper summarises the applications of electrical stimulation in spinal cord injury for rehabilitation purposes, and for the regeneration of the severed axons and the degree of functional/ anatomical recovery associated with by: Functional-Electrical-Rehabilitation-Technological-Restoration-After-Spinal-Cord-Va Adobe Acrobat Reader DCDownload Adobe Acrobat Reader DC Ebook PDF:With Acrobat Reader DC you can do more than just open and view PDF files Its easy to add annotations to documents using a complete set of commenting tools Take your PDF tools to go Work on.

Functional Electrical Stimulation in Neurorehabilitation. This course will provide a review over the principles of functional electrical stimulation (FES) and discuss the uses of FES in rehabilitation for persons with neurological injuries.

A review of current best evidence and several patient cases will 4/5(K). An Introduction to Rehabilitation Engineering - CRC Press Book Subsequent chapters examine design and service delivery principles of wheelchairs and scooters, functional electrical stimulation and its applications, wheelchair-accessible transportation legislation, and the applications of robotics in medical rehabilitation.

Functional electrical stimulation (FES) Functional electrical stimulation is a rehabilitation technology that uses electrical periodic pulses to stimulate the nerves that produce contractions in paralyzed muscles and recover lost functions.

There are two Cited by: 4.This reference text covers the fundamental knowledge and principles of functional electrical stimulation (FES) as applied to the spinal cord injured (SCI) patient. The principles of FES application and basic biomechanical issues related to FES in SCI are stressed.

The fundamentals regarding patient selection criteria, indication, contraindications, and descriptions of procedures are clearly.Evidence for functional electrical stimulation (FES) as a treatment option in adult neurological conditions has grown over the last 25 years.

Children and young people with neurological conditions can also benefit from FES treatments but there are gaps in clinical knowledge, awareness and evidence which need : Christine Singleton, Helen Jones, Lizz Maycock.